It’s Never Just a Number

Now is a really exciting time to have type 1 diabetes. I realize how absurd that sounds, but just 18 months ago we joined the diabetes world with a bag of syringes and a log book. A few months later our three year old transitioned to a pump and continuous glucose monitor (CGM). However, the data from pump and CGM were not compatible with a Mac. We found a workaround for the pump’s data through Diasend, but at the time it wasn’t approved for use in the States. Dexcom didn’t send data to anything other than the receiver. So these great tools existed, but they spoke different languages.

Thanks in large part to a vocal patient base, now a plethora of diabetes devices are working to speak the same language. The FDA is releasing products and software faster than anticipated. Just last week Dexcom G5 came out, which means a smart device can stand in for the receiver. Also, there’s the new Mac compatible software, Dexcom CLARITY. Here’s the great part: it works with Dexcom G4 and Dexcom Share. You don’t need Dexcom G5 to use Dexcom CLARITY. All you need is an account at Dexcom to download Dexcom CLARITY on your computer.

Information is power in the world of diabetes. Here’s the CGM data from the last two weeks.

Screen Shot 2015-09-07 at 10.41.36 AM

This is our best day; 74% of the readings were in range. On our best day we got a C-.

There are three common mantras in the diabetes world: numbers are just information, it’s never just a number, and keep calm and treat the number.

A few months after diagnosis, an adult friend with diabetes shared wise advice, “Never call a number good or bad. Just call it high or low.” We adopted this practice immediately, but are only now starting to see the reason.

Before programs like Diasend and Dexcom CLARITY, we looked at one number. If his meter said 70 we gave him a glucose tab or two. If his meter said 220 we corrected with an ezBG. Now we’re looking at aggregate data.

To keep our son’s blood sugar in range my husband and I have to work harder and more consistently on this than most of our daily tasks. We’re doing our best, so it’s easier to hear that he has, “significant time above the threshold from 9:50 p.m. to 12:20 a.m.” than, “those are some bad numbers.”

Right now, our best is a C-, but we have information we’re using to study for the test we’ll take in two weeks when we download the CGM’s data again. We have adjusted his basal program and decreased his bedtime snack bolus.

Here’s a question from next test:

Q. If a number is just information, what’s a gaggle of numbers?

A. Hopefully, a B-.

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